Chuen Hing: Hidden Chinese Gem Delivers Memorable Rosemead Meal [CLOSED]

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Chuen Hing expends most of their creative efforts on the food.

Henry Ng’s well-hidden Rosemead restaurant doesn’t even have a sign. Thankfully, Genevieve Ko’s Gourmet article from May led the way behind the grey building and past the glass doors to Chuen Hing, a Chiu Chow style restaurant that delivered one of the most memorable recent meals in the San Gabriel Valley.

When we sat down, I asked our young waitress for the best dishes and she said, “They’re not on the menu.” She walked me to the framed Gourmet article, pointed to some photos and suggested chow mein, brisket soup, green beans and oyster porridge. The porridge will have to wait, but we took her three other recommendations.


Chinese Food Los Angeles

We started with a plate of cool, crisp green beans ($8.95) coated with addictive spicy ginger sauce.

Chinese Food Los Angeles

For his chow mein, Ng made the fettuccini-like noodles in-house and loaded them with a blizzard of ground pork, scallions, briny dried shrimp and lip-stinging red and green chilies. The topper: nearly a dozen gigantic shrimp. Flavors were completely harmonious and built in intensity with each bite.

When we ordered, there was no telling how much the chow mein would cost, but when we saw the massive shrimp, we braced ourselves. Thankfully, when the bill arrived, the chow mein cost $21.95, which was a bargain considering the massive flavor and generous portion. The dish could have easily fed four people.

Chinese Food Los Angeles

Brisket soup ($9.95) had a clear almost pho-like broth, minus the complexity and accompanying vegetation and plus turnip cross sections. The brisket slices were tender and the soup was just fine, but with chow mein on the table, it might as well have been invisible.

Candy Dispenser Los Angeles

After our meal, Chef Ng opened lifted the lid on a golden bull and invited us to each take candy. Apparently the bull imparts good luck. Not that we needed it after eating his chow mein.

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Joshua Lurie

Joshua Lurie founded FoodGPS in 2005. Read about him here.

Blog Comments

Those shrimps are indeed gigantic. Thanks for the report. I don’t usually order chow mein when I go eat, but if that’s one of their best dishes, then I’ll have to try it.

Chow mein isn’t usually my first choice either, but Chuen Hing’s version is light years ahead of other versions. Give it a shot.

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