Hong Kong Top Restaurant Guide

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13. Ser Wong Fun (30 Cochrane Street, Central, 852 2543 1032)

The Fun family has run this side street restaurant for 46 years, and considering the name, which translates to “king of the snake,” don’t be surprised that Ser Wong Fun specializes in snake dishes. Third generation proprietor Gigi Ng and her mother also produce savory tonic soups, including a papaya, almond and pork soup that’s good for the lungs. House-made sausages are also standouts, including sweet, floral lap cheong and even richer duck liver sausage with punch from rice alcohol.

MUST ORDER: Lap Cheong, Duck Liver Sausage, Papaya Almond & Pork Soup

Restaurant Hong Kong
14. Spring Deer Restaurant (42 Mody Road, Tsim Sha Tsui, 852 2366 4012)

This Peking duck specialist resides on the second floor of a Tsim Sha Tsui building, with decor that includes white tablecloths, curtains, paintings of mist shrouded mountains. Yes, they roll dim sum carts through the dining room, but better to stick with classics like Barbecued Peking Duck, which they carve tableside, serve with pillowy handmade flour pancakes, thick hoisin, raw scallions and cucumber. The kitchen’s also skillful with seafood, including a surprising combo of either shrimp or crab “quick fried” with a fluffy mountain of egg whites.

MUST ORDER: Barbecued Peking Duck, Quick Fried Crab w/Egg White, Crystal Shrimp

Dim Sum Hong Kong
15. Tim Ho Wan (Sea View Building, No.2-8 Wharf Road, North Point, 852 2979 5608)

Chef Mak Kwai Pui started with a Mong Kok dim sum emporium and now has a lauded Hong Kong empire devoted to Cantonese bites. The newest branch in North Point, near the City Garden Hotel, features a glass front, wood tables and banquettes, and framed food photos. Order from a checklist, and be sure to stagger your order, to keep the food as fresh as possible. Expect refined versions of dim sum classics like siu mai, baked BBQ pork buns, and pan-fried turnip cake, plus progressives twists like chicken feet with abalone sauce, and spicy pan-fried peppers shaped like razor clams, filled with minced fish and pork.

MUST ORDER: Chicken Feet with Abalone Sauce, Steamed Pork Dumplings with Shrimp, Baked Bun with BBQ Pork, Pan Fried Green Pepper, Tonic Medlar & Petal Cake, Baked Taro Buns

Restaurant Hong Kong
16. Yan Toh Heen (18 Salisbury Road, Kowloon, 852 2313 2463)

At this refined, Michelin-starred Cantonese restaurant inside the InterContinental Hong Kong hotel, they offer prized Victoria Harbour views along with chef Lau Yiu Fai’s deluxe cuisine in a freshly updated setting. The restaurant now includes Jade place settings and napkin rings, white table cloths, and a framed Ron Hwang art piece made with thousands of pins and buttons. The chef features plenty of tried-and-true dishes, but also celebrates seasonal ingredients like hairy crab and rotates in progressive dishes like Wok-seared Cod Fish with Garlic, Preserved Olives and Herbs, served in a hot stone bowl. Dessert is consistently contemporary and dazzling and might consist of Chilled Mango Cream with Sago and Pomelo served under a smoking glass dome. Even classics like Baked Egg Tartlettes see flourishes like bird’s nest, which provides a collagen-rich contrast and is even good for your skin.

MUST ORDER: Steamed Hairy Crabmeat Roe with Pork Dumpling, Wok-seared Cod Fish with Garlic, Golden Scallops with Minced Shrimp and Fresh Pear, Preserved Olives and Herbs, Chilled Mango Cream with Sago and Pomelo, Basil Dragon Pearl served with Ginger Panna Cotta and Ice Cream

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Joshua Lurie

Joshua Lurie founded FoodGPS in 2005. Read about him here.

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