Top Los Angeles Deviled Eggs

Deviled Eggs Los Angeles

Clementine's deviled eggs are pretty classic and even come on a paper doily.

Deviled eggs aren’t nearly as insidious as they sound. In fact, this snack can be downright delicious. According to The Ancient History of Deviled Eggs, this dish has roots in ancient Rome and earned the “deviled” moniker in 1786 Great Britain, since they had the audacity to be spicy. The popular hors d’oeuvres propelled in popularity during World War II and are now having another moment. Learn about 6 of L.A.’s best deviled eggs.

Additions: Communal Food & Drink, Fishwives, Four Cafe
Cuts: Blue Cow Kitchen & Bar (Closed), Cavatina (N/A), Commissary (Closed), Faith & Flower (Closed), Farmshop (N/A), Mud Hen Tavern (Closed), Playa Provisions (N/A)

1. Clementine

Chef-owner Annie Miler has turned Clementine into an American comfort food juggernaut over the course of 15 years. The menu shifts some seasonally, but Deviled Eggs ($1.50 each) are a perennial standby. The filling combines egg yolks with mayo, Dijon mustard and freshly grated horseradish. Miler tops them with chives and thin-sliced radishes and chives for contrasting crunch.

2. Communal Food & Drink

Ashley Ahn and husband Steve own Mike & Anne’s nearby and Wistaria in Sierra Madre and replaced Firefly Bistro in 2015 near the Metro Gold Line station and Thursday night farmers market. Their “modern rustic beer garden” combines craft beer with comfort food on a tastefully tented space with ivy covered walls, light strings, and wood framework. File Deviled Eggs ($4) under “snacks” at Communal.


Deviled Eggs Los Angeles

Communal garnishes their eggy quartet with bacon bits, chives, crispy chicken skins and Aleppo pepper.

3. Fishwives

Emily Tsu and husband Tim Tang founded this Old Pasadena seafood restaurant with a fish hook logo in 2017. The couple added seating in a brick-lined passage to a back patio during the pandemic, increasing the number of people who can enjoy their creative, share-friendly preparations. Fried Oysters on Deviled Eggs ($15) feature plump, delicately coated Willapa Bay oysters from Washington served atop four deviled eggs blended with mayo, shallots, Dijon mustard, paprika, and Old Bay, with tarragon on top.

Deviled Eggs Los Angeles

Fishwives secures their fully loaded deviled eggs to the dish with more devilish filling.

4. Four Cafe

Longtime Eagle Rock culinary force Michelle Wilton runs Penny Oven bakery-cafe across the street, which also houses Good Fire square-cut pizza and Holi organic takeout Indian cuisine. Four Cafe debuted in 2010 and remains her seasonal flagship. Wilton’s vibrant preparations extend to small plates like Deviled Eggs (3 for $4.50).

Deviled Eggs Los Angeles

Four Cafe dresses their deviled eggs with cornichons and dill and stabilizes them with smoked paprika aioli.

5. La Grande Orange Café

At this renovated railway station from LGO Hospitality, which resides at the Gold Line’s Del Mar station, their Deviled Eggs ($5/8) may look retro, but have layers of flavor. Eggs are folded with house-made mayo, pickle relish, minced chives, basil, hot sauce, Kosher salt and fresh cracked black pepper.

Deviled Eggs Los Angeles

Crumbled bacon is optional at LGO, but should be mandatory, since they pump up flavor and crunch.

6. The Sycamore Kitchen

At this modern, industrial chic cafe from Karen Hatfield and husband Quinn amidst La Brea’s furniture and design studios, seasonal comfort food gets refined twists. The couple’s delectable Deviled Eggs ($6.50) originally incorporated smoked salmon and currently combine eggs, house-made aioli, chives, and garbanzo beans smoked in-house with hickory chips.

Deviled Eggs Los Angeles

Consider The Sycamore Kitchen’s deviled eggs an obligatory lunchtime starter.

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Joshua Lurie

Joshua Lurie founded FoodGPS in 2005. Read about him here.

Blog Comments

Any of these places put curry powder in their deviled eggs? For me, the addition of curry takes a deviled egg from good to great.

Bigmouth, curry powder sounds like a fun ingredient, but I don’t believe any of these deviled eggs use it.

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