Pizzeria Bianco: Masterful Phoenix Pizza That Tests Patience

Pizza Phoenix


About ten years ago, I was driving cross-country and ate dinner at Pizzeria Bianco. I liked Chris Bianco’s pizza so much, I returned the following day for lunch. Years later, and dozens of national write-ups later, Pizzeria Bianco no longer has to serve lunch to generate enough business. Instead, hours are limited to five hours a night, 5-10 PM, Tuesday through Saturday. There are no reservations, and it was a Saturday, so we arrived at 4 PM to score a spot in the first seating. There were already about twenty-five people sitting on benches and metal chairs outside the former home of the Baird Machine Shop, built in 1929. At about 4:30, anxiety settled over the mounting crowd and people began lining up. And lining up. And lining up. There were about twenty people in front of us, but with 43 seats, I wasn’t worried…yet.

Pizzeria Phoenix
By the time the front door opened at 5:02, the line had reached triple digits. A woman emerged from Pizzeria Bianco and asked everybody in line to take three steps back so she could open the door and begin letting people in. As it turned out, seemingly solo diners were serving as proxy for larger groups, and our first seating status was in jeopardy. As diners filtered into the restaurant, it got to the point where there were only six seats left at the bar, and only two pairs in front of us. Or so we thought. A man at the head of the line announced there were TWELVE people in his party. The hostess offered him the final six seats at the bar, and the man took them, with total disregard for the other six people in his party, who were relegated to an hour-and-a-half wait.

At this point, the hostess began writing down names on a list. Securing second pole position, we chose “first available.” We were given an ETA of one hour and told to remain between the pizzeria and Bar Bianco, where they’d call my name.

Bar Phoenix
Bar Bianco is situated next door in a circa-1909 house that was moved to Heritage Square in the ’80s, featuring a shaded porch and a beautiful wood interior. After standing in another long line, to get drinks at the bar, it became obvious why Chris Bianco opened the bar, and why he doesn’t offer reservations. Happily, the porch was actually a pleasant place to pass the time, watching the foot traffic on pedestrian-only Heritage Square, a revamped historic area featuring the Arizona Science Center, the Phoenix Museum of History, and the Arizona Doll & Toy Museum.

Focaccia Phoenix
I didn’t know this at 4 PM, but Bar Bianco features a short menu of interesting bar snacks: Fra’ Mani charcuterie, cheeses, and a couple creations made using that amazing Bianco bread. This grilled split focaccia with fontina ($6) was served with a skewer of sweet bread-and-butter pickles. It wasn’t pizza, but warm bread and oozing cheese are still a winning combination.

Olives Phoenix
We also scored a bowl of meaty Cerignola olives ($4).

I drank a glass of Thunder Canyon cream ale (Tucson, AZ) on tap, along with bottled Coke.

Less than an hour after I gave the hostess my name, I was led to a table in the back of Pizzeria Bianco.

Pizza Phoenix
Chris Bianco, a Bronx native, has made pizzas for twenty years in Phoenix alone, and he still maintains exacting standards when producing his famous pizzas from his wood fired-oven.

Bread Phoenix
While waiting for our order, I spotted a stack of fresh-baked country loaves.

Bread Phoenix
I nibbled on country bread, dipping the crusty slices in a dish of premium olive oil.

Italian Food Phoenix
I knew we’d encounter some serious pizza, but I never expected to find such an incredible starter. Spiedini means skewers in Italian ($9). Pizzeria Bianco’s current version features Italian fontina wrapped in prosciutto di Parma, served on a bed of arugula that’s dressed with vinaigrette. The cheese was hot, but not hot enough to ooze off the skewer, and the surrounding prosciutto was salty and crispy and just the best shell imaginable.

Pizza Phoenix
We wanted one pizza with sauce and one without. For the sauce-laden pizza, we ordered the Sonny Boy ($13), holding a thin layer of robust tomato sauce, fresh mozzarella, Gaeta olives and salami shipped from New York, made crispy in the oven. The crust was excellent, with a good chew, and not a dry centimeter to be found.

Pizza Phoenix
Our sauce-free selection was the Wiseguy ($14), topped with candy-sweet wood-roasted onions, phenomenal house-smoked mozzarella, and spicy cuts of fennel sausage from Schreiner’s Fine Sausage in Phoenix. The ingredients were so stellar, I actually didn’t miss tomato sauce.

Pizzeria Bianco offers coffee, but no desserts. I needed caffeine fix, but took sympathy on the waiting diners and got coffee elsewhere.On the walk out, Chris Bianco and his staff thanked us for eating there. I told him it was “well worth the wait.” After being reminded of Bianco’s pizza mastery, there’s no chance I’ll wait another decade for a return trip.

Pizzeria Bianco is officially open Tuesday-Saturday from 5–10 PM, but if you get your name on the list by 10, you may be seated past midnight.

Pizzeria Bianco: Masterful Phoenix Pizza That Tests Patience

Tags:

Joshua Lurie

Joshua Lurie founded FoodGPS in 2005. Read about him here.

Blog Comments

[…] Puppet Mastery | The Chicago WeeklyAbdul Tabini, Ward III, The Odeon : Starkman & AssociatesPhiladelphia on Philm « MUSEYON GUIDESAct II Insider » Blog Archive » IRON KISSES Playwright to Receive 2009 Medallion Award Breaking Down & Butchering A Cow at Grill MaestroInterview with Mark Pastore, Founder, Incanto Restaurant | Green Business Innovators, helping businesses be more successful by being greenMastering Fish the Japanese Way « gohansociety.orgNew Restaurant Owners and Buyers Must Watch Lease Agreements | Starting A Restaurant BlogChina Guide 2008 » Wudang Shan, the Mountain of TaoFood GPS » Pizzeria Bianco – Phoenix, AZ – April 7, 2007 […]

Leave a Comment