Food Forward: L.A. Wholesale Produce Market Recovery Tour

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Food Charity Los Angeles


Before dawn on October 29, I joined Food Forward founder Rick Nahmias and Wholesale Recovery Manager, Luis Yepiz, on a tour of the Los Angeles Wholesale Produce Market. This open-air market was built in the 1980s, replacing a century-old facility that serviced horses and buggies. Now about 30 vendors, many third- and fourth-generation, operate wholesale docks, with larger warehouses elsewhere. More importantly, several vendors donate excess produce to Food Forward, a North Hollywood-based charity whose mission is to rescue and donate local produce that would otherwise go to waste. Backyard fruit picks and recovery from local farmers markets have been vital, but the bulk of produce now comes from produce market recovery efforts, with produce going to local food pantries and helping feed over over 1 million hungry Southern Californians each year. This sojourn allowed me (and other Food Forward supporters) to better understand how produce market recovery works.

Food Charity Los Angeles
L.A. Wholesale Produce Market is a fairly new initiative that’s been a game-changer for Food Forward and hungry Angelenos. Yepiz walks the market on weekdays starting from 3-4am to coordinate pick-ups with donors. Last August, Food Forward upgraded from a borrowed truck to a vehicle that carries away 15,000 pounds of produce per day, 2-6 times per day. Incredibly, there’s so much excess food as part of systemic waste that Food Forward still has to turn down pick-up requests. Generally, a lot of produce is sold on consignment.

Thankfully, the eco-friendly tide seems to be turning. Now the Los Angeles Wholesale Produce Market partners with a waste management company to collect recyclables, compostables and landfill, though there’s still room for improvement.

Food Charity Los Angeles
Yepiz said that this old school process requires slapping backs and saying hello daily. Nahmias added, “If we didn’t come for three days, we’d be out of business.”

Produce markets donors do receive a tax credit for giving excess produce to Food Forward, but the main motivation for vendors is to save on waste removal fees.

Food Charity Los Angeles
On the day I visited, Food Forward anticipated three loads, mostly organic ginger, 80,000 pounds total. The surplus varies, depending on the season. For example, in February, there’s a surplus of romaine hearts and cabbage.

Food Charity Los Angeles
Yepiz and and Food Forward driver Felipe Maldonado review produce daily. 80% of the produce has to be good for them to take it to food banks. Nahmias said, “We can’t be a garbage dump.”

Distribution starts locally with organizations like Dream Center, MEND and Heart of Compassion. From there, Food Forward looks to places 20 miles away.

Nahmias said, “2 million people are in hunger in this area. It kills me…the problem is distribution.” The goal is to “Feed the top of the pyramid and let it redistribute.” Hopefully other organizations step up to save exceed food from waste, or Food Forward accumulates enough resources to increase their efforts.

Food Charity Los Angeles
Food Forward is selling an amazing array of Holiday Gifts that benefit Food Forward’s anti-hunger programs. 100% of proceeds fund programs that are now collecting an 165,000 pounds of fresh produce per week that reaches over a million people in need each year.

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Joshua Lurie

Joshua Lurie founded FoodGPS in 2005. Read about him here.

Blog Comments

Dear Rick,

I believe we know each other from about 20 years ago when you came to our house on Huntley Dr. to take pictures and write about the people struggling with HIV/AIDS. Your published your book and now you are running with this Non Profit. What a great organization you have founded. As you can see we are both serving the hungry and homeless in Los Angeles.
All the Best
John Shinavier aka Laxman Das, Executive Director

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