Food

Two Food Writers Named Josh Talk Competitive Eating

By | July 6, 2017 2 comments
Two Food Writers Named Josh Talk Competitive Eating Why settle for normal sized food, or standard portions?

Giant Food
After Joey Chestnut took down 72 hot dogs at the annual Nathan’s Famous Hot Dog Eating Contest on July 4, I was once again reminded of the extreme gluttony of professional eating competitions. That day, ESPN sports business reporter Darren Rovell broke down the 10-time champ’s eye-popping intake, which included 20,160 calories and 1,296 fat grams. I took to Twitter to share my disbelief, and fellow L.A. food writer Josh Scherer[email protected] had some interesting responses. I enjoyed the back and forth, and hopefully you do. Read our Twitter discussion, and let me know where you stand on eating competitions in Comments.

Josh Lurie-Food GPS[email protected]
Competitive eating is something I don’t understand, appreciate, or support. These “athletes” take years off their lives. For what?

Josh Scherer[email protected]
They probably enjoy doing it a whole bunch.

Josh Lurie-Food GPS[email protected]
Probably, but to quote the James Cagney movie, “What Price Glory?”

Josh Scherer[email protected]
I think its more self fulfillment than glory in the traditional sense. Enjoyment not from holding a trophy but challenging yourself everyday

Josh Scherer[email protected]
Same could be said for football players, boxers, journos working 16 hour days. All take years off, everyone does it from some sense of love

Josh Lurie-Food GPS[email protected]
You’re right, we’ve learned football and boxing are also self-destructive. That byproduct may ultimately tear down those sports.

Josh Scherer[email protected]
Like I don’t think boxing should exist but I totally understand and respect the commitment of boxers.

Josh Lurie-Food GPS[email protected]
Sadly, many people who commit to sports like boxing and football participate to escape oppressive socioeconomic conditions. Not comp. eating

Josh Scherer[email protected]
I’d actually be curious to see that data on comp eaters’ socioeconomic backgrounds. I honestly have no guesses.

Josh Lurie-Food GPS[email protected]
Potential rewards for even most famous competitive eaters are infinitesimal compared to potential rewards for boxers and football players.

Josh Scherer[email protected]
For sure. But if you can eat real fast and you can’t run or punch good, you could see that as an opportunity. Money does play a role here.

Josh Lurie-Food GPS[email protected]
True. I appreciate your alternative perspectives, and you made me think about competitive eating in new ways, but I’m still not on board.

Josh Scherer[email protected]
Haha likewise man, good chatting. I have no intentions of A Clockwork Orangeing your eyes open to watch the gyoza eating championship.

Josh Lurie-Food GPS[email protected]
If that’s the most horrific thing I have to witness, I’ll take the gyoza eating championship any day.

Comments

  1. Competitive eating truly is in a class of its own, but then again, our society seems to thrive on the bizarre. That being said, after putting down a few hot dogs ourselves for the 4th the thought of taking down 72 in rapid fire style is… intense to say the least. We’d love to see how a gyoza competition would go down. Consider us staying tuned…

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